Our TWAers have lots of items to contribute to our group. Send YOUR ideas and contributions to our Webmaster (click on Contacts on the top line or left index at the bottow). So, let's push back from the gate and prepare for takeoff....

Take a look at the L-1049 Connie startup and takeoff. It will really being back memories: CLICK HERE to see it.

Take a step back in time and check the great video we received from Marc Brecy in Paris. Marc was the webmaster of the Seniors and Pilots websites for years. CLICK HERE for your views of the 1947 Connie!

Thanks again to Phil Carlson for finding another gem...TWA leads the way in InFlight Movies! CLICK HERE for the info.

Also from Marc...On February 5, 1946, the Constellation "Star of Paris" Inaugurated International service for Trans World Airlines. The aircraft used on this flight was a Constellation 049 model 49-51-26, plane number NC86505, TWA fleet #550. CLICK HERE FOR THE GREAT STORY

                  

As you may know, TWA was formerly known as TAT, the first commercial airline, and the eastern terminal of the first trans-continental air/rail route was in Columbus, Ohio (CMH). The original building, opened in 1929, on a site chosen by Charles Lindbergh, is now in the National Register of Historic Places. Its restoration is a project of the Columbus Historical Society and "An Evening of Aviation History" was held on June 24, 2015, at Hangar One by the Original Airport Terminal. CLICK HERE for all the details.

Do you remember the special TWA DC-9 with the "Wings of Pride" livery? Well, it's back again! CLICK HERE for the interesting story about this and other members of the TWA fleet.

Thanks to  Phil Carlson for sending us an amazing video of five Airbus aircarft flying in formation. To watch the video CLICK HERE

NEW YEAR'S DAY 2014 marks the 100th anniversary of the first commercial flight in 1914. The IATA has established a web site honoring this milestone. TWA is noted in 1961 for the first inflight movies. CLICK HERE

Thanks again to Phil Carlson, here is a great article by Jon Proctor covering the history of our beloved L-1011 Tri-Star. To view all of this very interesting story, CLICK HERE.

Phil Carlson has alerted us to the new "816 Hotel" in Kansas City that features themed rooms. CLICK HERE for a video showing this unusual hotel. The "TWA Room" is the second room in the video. There is a beverage cart, 2 coach seats, a life vest in a shadow box and a first aid kit in the bathroom for hotel amenities.There is complementary shuttle service for guests between the hotel and the TWA Museum.

Here's a great poem from Hugh Kelley:

  

THE ONE AND ONLY AIRLINE

  

AS AIRLINE LORE AND STORIES GO

THERE’S ONE THAT STANDS ALONE

THE ONE WE ALL REMEMBER

ALTHOUGH IT’S LONG SINCE GONE.

  

IT GAINED IT’S FAME WHEN THE CONNIES CAME

AND FROM A GUY NAMED HOWARD HUGHES.

THE 3 TAIL BIRD AND MOVIE STARS

WERE ALWAYS IN THE NEWS.

  

THE FIRST TO FLY CROSS COUNTRY

AND THEN ACROSS THE SEA

AND HOW I FEEL SO LUCKY 

TO HAVE BEEN AN EMPLOYEE.

  

FROM IDLEWILD TO MIDWAY AND KC TO LA

THEN ALL THE WAY TO PARIS

AND BACK TO THE USA.

  

WE FLEW THE RICH AND FAMOUS

CELEBS AND SPORT STARS TOO

AND ALL THE OTHER FOLKS

AS THROUGH THE YEARS WE GREW.

  

IN ’59 THE JET AGE CAME

OUR HEARTS WERE FILLED WITH PRIDE

THINGS WERE CHANGING FAST

AND WE ALL ENJOYED THE RIDE.

  

FROM PUSHING STAIRS TO JETWAYS

AND PAPER SKIRTS THE RAGE

WE WERE #1 IN EVERYTHING

AS THE SKIES BECAME OF AGE.

  

WE COULD SEE THE END A’COMIN’

OH, BUT ALL TOO FAST

AND WHEN 800 HAPPENED

WE KNEW IT COULDN’T LAST.

  

SO, WE ALL PLAYED OUR PARTS

ALONG ITS STORIED WAY

FOR US THE ONLY AIRLINE

WAS CALLED TWA.

  

 

HUGH KELLEY

GATE AGENT MDW-ORD 1959-1972

  

  

The Maintenance and Ramp group held their annual 2014 picnic on September 13 and a great video of the entire group was made by  R.C.White. Be sure to watch the video to the very end! Take a look at the gang by CLICKING HERE.

Henry 'Willie' Willerscheidt, retired Fueler from ORD, forwarded the following website address:

http://www.twaspirit.com/index.html  

 "I thought you all would like it. Ruth is a big TWA promoter…I guess I would be too if my Dad help found TWA…Capt.Paul  Ritcher.

Ruth owns the Spirit of TWA airplane and she takes it all over to shows ….she is in a lot of the pictures too…some of you may know her…"

Thanks, Willie, for sharing!!

  

At our Octoberfest 2012 luncheon, I had the opportunity to speak with Bill Blaney, former mechanic. Bill told me the story of, along with Bob Farrell, being "caught" by the camera in the great movie North by Northwest. It seems that a scene was filmed at Gate 12 at MDW and, if you watch the movie carefully, you'll see two mechanics in the background wearing their white coveralls. Those are Bill and Tom. They were about to kick out a filght when the scene was being filmed. Not 15 minutes of fame, guys, but it all counts! Congratulations.

  

...John Holmes

Thanks to Phil Carlson for alerting us to a great historical video of the Lockheed L-1011 Tristar - "Rollout & First Flight" - 1970 CLICK HERE

Again, thanks to Phil Carlson for sharing a great YouTube video of the first Pam Am flight to Midway and beyond. Click HERE for the video.

Phil Carlson has made some more discoveries...TWA advertising! CLICK HERE for your enjoyment!

Phil Carlson has come through again with a gem:

IF AIRLINES SOLD PAINT

   From an airline Captain with more than three decades in the airline industry. He says "I never really understood how airline ticket pricing worked until I read this analogy.   

Customer: Hi. How much is your paint?

Clerk: Well, sir, that all depends on quite a lot of things.

Customer: Can you give me a guess? Is there an average price?

Clerk: Our lowest price is $12 a gallon, and we have 60 different prices up to $200 a gallon.

Customer: What's the difference in the paint?

Clerk: Oh, there isn't any difference; it's all the same paint.

Customer: Well, then I'd like some of that $12 paint.

Clerk: When do you intend to use the paint?

Customer: I want to paint tomorrow. It's my day off.

Clerk: Sir, the paint for tomorrow is the $200 paint.

Customer: When would I have to paint to get the $12 paint?

Clerk: You would have to start very late at night in 21 days, or about 3 weeks. But you will have to agree to start painting before Friday of that week and continue painting until at least Sunday.

Customer: You've got to be *&%^#@* kidding!

Clerk: I'll check and see if we have any paint available.

Customer: You have shelves FULL of paint! I can see it!

Clerk: But it doesn't mean that we have paint available. We sell only a certain number of gallons on any given weekend. Oh, and by the way, the price per gallon just went to $16. We don't have any more $12 paint.

Customer: The price went up as we were talking?

Clerk: Yes, sir. We change the prices and rules hundreds of times a day, and since you haven't actually walked out of the store with your paint yet, we just decided to change. I suggest you purchase your paint as soon as possible. How many gallons do you want?

Customer: Well, maybe five gallons. Make that six, so I'll have enough.

Clerk: Oh no, sir, you can't do that. If you buy paint and don't use it, there are penalties and possible confiscation of the paint you already have. If you change any colors there is a $50.00 change fee, even if it is the same brand. Also, no refunds.

Customer: WHAT?

Clerk: We can sell enough paint to do your kitchen, bathroom, hall and north bedroom, but if you stop painting before you do the bedroom, you will lose your remaining gallons of paint.

Customer: What does it matter whether I use all the paint? I already paid you for it!

Clerk: We make plans based upon the idea that all our paint is used, every drop. If you don't, it causes us all sorts of problems.

Customer: This is crazy!! I suppose something terrible happens if I don't keep painting until after Saturday night!

Clerk: Oh yes! Every gallon you bought automatically becomes the $200 paint.

Customer: But what are all these, "Paint on sale from $12 a gallon", signs?

Clerk: Well that's for our budget paint. It only comes in half-gallons. One $6 half-gallon will do half a room. The second half-gallon to complete the room is $20. None of the cans have labels, some are empty and there are no refunds, even on the empty cans.

Customer: To hell with this! I'll buy what I need somewhere else!

Clerk: I don't think so, sir. You may be able to buy paint for your bathroom and bedrooms, and your kitchen and dining room from someone else, but you won't be able to paint your connecting hall and stairway from anyone but us. And I should point out, sir, that if you paint in only one direction, it will be $300 a gallon.

Customer: I thought your most expensive paint was $200!

Clerk: That's if you paint around the room to the point at which you started. A hallway is different. 

Customer: And if I buy $200 paint for the hall, but only paint in one direction, you'll confiscate the remaining paint.

Clerk: Yes, and we'll charge you an extra use fee plus the difference on your next gallon of paint. But I believe you're getting it now, sir.

Customer: You're insane!

Clerk: Thanks for painting with Your favoriate Airline

~ Author Unknown

Jon Proctor was a DCS and is now an accomplished author of many items of interest to TWAers. The most recent is his recounting of his RTW (Round-The-World) trips. Jon makes this note: "I've made two trips around the world.  RTW II will be chronicled in a future posting. This first one covers a behind-the-scenes review of the trip, i.e. it’s not a travelogue.  Although notes were kept, bear in mind that much of what I’ve written is from the memories of 35 years ago [1980]." CLICK HERE FOR THE STORY!

"Airways Classics" magazine in 2012 featured TWA with the classic "double pumpkin" logo. Could that be a 707 "water wagon" lurking in the background? The issue's featured article was written by Jon Proctor, InFlight Services Supervisor. Here is a synopsis: A lavish pictorial tribute to one of the most recognized and world-renowned names in US airline history, whose employees built a stellar reputation for excellence.

The pioneering TWA boasted the fastest transcontinental service, launching the famed Douglas Commercial line and the Lockheed Constellation series, and was inextricably linked with the glamor of Hollywood through owner Howard Hughes.

Sadly, this issue is out of print and no longer available.  

Airways Classic Oct 2012 with Jon Proctor feature

Take a look at the TWA 707 below and read the fascinating story about the "change" in livery. Thanks to Jon Proctor for the information and the background details!  

Howard Hughes couldn't finance all the early TWA 707s without putting up his personal money as collateral, and wound up selling 6 early delivery positions to Pan Am; this was one of them; all were on the assembly line at the time and thus had the -331 designations (Pan Am's were -321s).

Jon Proctor 

Sandpoint, Idaho

twadcs@gmail.com

www.jonproctor.net  

N704PA, Boeing 707-331, Clipper Defiance, notes: C/n 17683, originally registered to Trans World Airlines, N771TW, but was never actually delivered.  

Instead, this Boeing 707 was delivered to Pan Am on 23 March 1960. Pan Am leased this Boeing 707 to Trans Polar, but the aircraft was never taken up. 

Instead, Pan Am leased it to World Airways for a few months in 1972, after which it was placed in storage at Oakland, California. 

Pan Am then leased, and later sold, this airliner outright to Air Vietnam on 21 December 1973. 

On 13 August 1975, Pan Am repossessed the airframe from Air Vietnam, and sold it a few months later to Aircraft Radio, Inc. 

In June 1977, this Boeing 707 was scrapped at Long Beach, California.

This was originally a TWA 707. Details provided by Jon Proctor.

Here's another great article that will bring back memories. To quote Phil Carlson:

"The article tells how it was in the '50s and '60s. The average 'stew's career lasted about 18 months. (By the way, TWA never used the term 'stewardess'; we had 'Air Hostesses' and 'Cabin Attendants' and 'Ground Hostesses'. Most of the ground hostesses ran our Ambassador Clubs or were airport passenger service reps. They were super, well, super everything; many were former air hostesses too good to let go.) But air hostesses were 'let go' as soon as they married, got pregnant or turned age thirty two.

Folks who were not around at the time will think this is fabricated or exaggerated. It is not. Today's women may well find it offensive.  The average career span was quite brief, It was considered a glamorous, once in a life time experience that many aspired to - kind of a single girl's last fling. CLICK HERE AND READ THE DETAILS!

  

With the passing of John Glenn in 2016, Hugh Kelley has penned another gem...

OUR ASTRONAUT

  

We could see it in the distance

The Mercury Friendship Seven

In its silver morning mist

It awaits its launch toward heaven.

  

As we all took our posts

And on top locked in the pod

The man had no control 

He was in the hands of God.

  

The countdown was complete

And the rocket roared towards space

John Glenn led the way

And America led the race.

  

Three times he circled earth 

And sunsets he did see

And after three plus hours

He splashed down in the sea.

  

Some thirty odd years later 

And service to mankind

He rode to outer space again

No braver man you’d find.

  

At ninety-five he leaves us 

The last of the first seven

And now he finally makes it

All the way to heaven.

  

  

Hugh Kelley - 2016  

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